RAJITA CHAUDHURI
 
 
  
In search of excellence

One of those rare books on management that are both consistently thought-provoking and fun to read.

The Greatest Business Book of All Time, In Search of Excellence has long been a must-have for the boardroom, business school, and bedside table.

Based on a study of forty-three of America's best-run companies from a diverse array of business sectors, In Search of Excellence describes eight basic principles of management -- action-stimulating, people-oriented, profit-maximizing practices -- that made these organizations successful.

Know how

In Know-How, Ram Charan, coauthor of the bestseller Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done, gives readers a bold new approach to understanding leadership. Charan suggests that when it comes to choosing our business leaders, we don't recognize the crucial difference between the appearance of leadership and the actual ability to run a business. We focus too much on superficial things, like raw intelligence or a commanding presence, and don't pay near enough attention to the skills leaders need.

Why we want you to be rich

The wildly financially successful authors of this book state, early on, that a reader will not find in its pages specific advice on how to make or invest money. It's more a book of philosophy (note the "why" in the title), and if it's not exactly Kierkegaardian in scope or language, this collaboration of real estate magnate and rags-to-riches financial guru manages to entertain and to inform. Written in bite-size chunks and adorned with quotes (some from the authors' previous works or speeches) and graphs, it explains why some people get rich and others... well, don't.

The Go point

One of the world’s most noted leadership experts, Michael Useem uses dramatic story¬telling to show how to master the art and science of being decisive. He places you smack in the middle of people who faced their go point, when actions–or lack of them–determined the fates of individuals, companies, and countries.

Loosing my virginity

In this autobiography, Virgin Group founder Richard Branson says one of his prime business criteria is "fun." Fun made Branson a billionaire, and few business memoirs are one-billionth as fun as Branson's, nor as niftily written. Not only does it relate his side of near-death corporate experiences, it tells how the chairman literally cheated death by gun, shipwreck, and balloon crash.

the 8th habit

The original seven habits of highly successful people are still relevant, but Covey, author of the mega-bestseller of that title, says that the new Information/Knowledge Worker Age, exemplified by the Internet, calls for an eighth habit to achieve personal and organizational excellence: "Find your voice and inspire others to find theirs." Covey sees leadership "as a choice to deal with people in a way that will communicate to them their worth and potential so clearly they will come to see it in themselves." His holistic approach starts with developing one's own voice, one's "unique personal significance." The bulk of the book details how, after finding your own voice, you can inspire others and create a workplace where people feel engaged. This includes establishing trust, searching for third alternatives (not a compromise between your way and my way, but a third, better way) and developing a shared vision. This book isn't easy going; less business jargon and more practical examples would have made this livelier and more helpful. But if organizations operated with Covey's ideas—and ideals—most people would undoubtedly find work much more satisfying.

fortune at the bottom of pyramid

"C. K. Prahalad argues that companies must revolutionize how they dobusiness in developing countries if both sides of that economic equation areto prosper. Drawing on a wealth of case studies, his compelling new bookoffers an intriguing blueprint for how to fight poverty with profitability."

Bill Gates, Chairman and Chief Software Architect,Microsoft "The Bottom of the Pyramid belongs at the top of the reading list forbusiness people, academics, and experts pursuing the elusive goal ofsustainable growth in the developing world. C. K. Prahalad writes withuncommon insight about consumer needs in poor societies andopportunities for the private sector to serve important public purposes whileenhancing its own bottom line. If you are looking for fresh thinking aboutemerging markets, your search is ended. This is the book for you."

how to get rich

With a central role in NBC’s The Apprentice, Trump’s star is soaring. In his fifth book (after The Art of the Deal, he offers a cursory glance behind the scenes of the hit reality show, but the bulk of the text consists of business advice ("Be Tenacious"; "Play Golf"; "Be Optimistic, but Always Be Prepared for the Worst") with illustrative details culled from his real estate and media dealings. (The glimpses he presents of his transformation of 40 Wall Street hint at a story that might deserve a more serious book all its own.) of capturing his grand personality in print, and this volume is no exception.

how toyota became no 1

Magee, a columnistat the Chattanooga Times Free Press, ably chronicles the rise of leading auto manufacturer Toyota and the underlying principles that led to its ascendancy. From lean production to a long-term focus to specialized philosophies like kaizen (a system of continuous improvement in which instances of waste are eliminated one by one) and genchi genbutsu (a belief in practical experience over theoretical knowledge), Magee documents each contributing factor in Toyota's success. Going back as far as Toyota founder Kiichiro Toyoda's father Sakichi Toyoda, a successful inventor who inspired and financed the car company's first operations, Magee takes the reader through the company's current challenges and achievements.

made in america

The late Sam Walton was one of the shrewdest and richest merchants in America. Centered on the building of his Wal-Mart empire, his book, like fellow magnate Sandra Kurtzig's CEO: Building a $400 Million Company from Ground Up ( LJ 5/1/91), is light on biography. However, readers will enjoy the folksy narrative of the small-town millionaire who revolutionized retail distribution. Walton also addresses accusations against him, such as running the competition out of town. Coauthor Huey does a fine job of incorporating candid testimonials from family members and associates, who thought Walton's ideas were sometimes silly. Shortly after Walton's death, the book was given an overly sentimental postscript (a minor detraction) and rushed into print. Highly recommended for public and academic business collections.

no logo

In No Logo, Klein patiently demonstrates, step by step, how brands have become ubiquitous, not just in media and on the street but increasingly in the schools as well. (The controversy over advertiser-sponsored Channel One may be old hat, but many readers will be surprised to learn about ads in school lavatories and exclusive concessions in school cafeterias.) The global companies claim to support diversity, but their version of "corporate multiculturalism" is merely intended to create more buying options for consumers. When Klein talks about how easy it is for retailers like Wal-Mart and Blockbuster to "censor" the contents of videotapes and albums, she also considers the role corporate conglomeration plays in the process. How much would one expect Paramount Pictures, for example, to protest against Blockbuster's policies, given that they're both divisions of Viacom?

ODESSEY pepsi to apple

It is hard to not want to read a book about how the founder of Apple was sacked by the guy he brought in himself, to lead the company. And that is precisely what the first part of the book is about. In a tale of roaring passion and excitement, we walk through pages in almost quivering excitement as we read about the stony-mahagony culture of Pepsi, the young irreverent west coast start-ups, the passion and idealism of youth, the quest for making a difference to the world, the heady mix of million dollar stock options and unruly aesthetic genius... and how it all culminated at the altar of capitalistic zeal and resulted in Steve Jobs being sacked by John Sculley and the board.

rich dad poor dad

"If you want all insider wisdom on how to personally get and STAY rich, read this book! Bribe your kids (financially, if you have to) to do the same." -- --Mark Victor Hansen, co-author of the #1 Chicken Soup for the Soul series

"To get over the top financially, you must read RICH DAD, POOR DAD. It's common sense and market savvy for your financial future

self leadership and the one minute manager

Blanchard, author of the bestselling One Minute Manager, has a made a career out of writing the business equivalent of Jonathan Livingston Seagull. The self-appointed "Chief Spiritual Officer" of Ken Blanchard Companies, he portrays a business world in which magic tricks and mentors encountered in bohemian cafes lead troubled employees to promotions and advertising awards. Blanchard's point here is that managers are too busy and distracted to effectively mentor employees and that workers need to assume responsibility for their own failures and successes-seeking the advice of superiors only when they absolutely need to. This is undeniably true. The modern workplace-an uncertain world where layoffs and reorganizations occur with unsettling frequency-requires self-reliance.

the apple way

The Apple Way divulges the secrets and management principles that keep Apple far ahead of the curve. Find out how to implement these and other winning strategies in your organization to trigger a technological and stylistic revolution of your own: • Make the customer and the product king  • Balance manufacturing with delivery logistics • Motivate and inspire people outside the company to do your marketing and public relations  • Invent new distribution channels  • Decide on your company image and stick to your guns  • Leapfrog the competition  • Learn from both successes and missteps

the google story

Social phenomena happen, and the historians follow. So it goes with Google, the latest star shooting through the universe of trend-setting businesses. This company has even entered our popular lexicon: as many note, "Google" has moved beyond noun to verb, becoming an action which most tech-savvy citizens at the turn of the twenty-first century recognize and in fact do, on a daily basis. It's this wide societal impact that fascinated authors David Vise and Mark Malseed, who came to the book with well-established reputations in investigative reporting.

the mckinsey way

The McKinsey Way, by former McKinsey & Company associate Ethan M. Rasiel, provides a through-the-keyhole perspective on the way this worldwide consulting institution approaches--and solves--the myriad professional problems encountered by its high-powered clientele. His goal, Rasiel writes, is simple: to communicate "new and useful skills to everyone who wants to be more useful in their business." He then does so by explaining the highly structured, fact-based proprietary methodology that McKinseyites are taught to employ with their Fortune 100 clients, complete with details on the entire process from first considering the basic situation at hand through finally selling a solution to the appropriate powers that be.

the power of positive thinking

The Power of Positive Thinking has helped millions of men and women to achieve fulfillment in their lives. In this phenomenal bestseller, Dr. Peale demonstrates the power of faith in action. With the practical techniques outlined in this book, you can energize your life -- and give yourself the initiative needed to carry out your ambitions and hopes. You'll learn how to:  • believe in yourself and in everything you do  • build new power and determination  • develop the power to reach your goals  • break the worry habit and achieve a relaxed life  • improve your personal and professional relationships  • assume control over your circumstances • be kind to yourself

the toyota way

How to speed up business processes, improve quality, and cut costs in any industry In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability. Complete with profiles of organizations that have successfully adopted Toyota's principles, this book shows managers in every industry how to improve business processes by: • Eliminating wasted time and resources  • Building quality into workplace systems  • Finding low-cost but reliable alternatives to expensive new technology  • Producing in small quantities  • Turning every employee into a qualitycontrol inspector

the walmart way

This book is a cross between college text, motivational epic, and company history, written by the former vice chairman and COO of Wal-Mart. First, Soderquist spells out 12 reasons behind the success of Wal-Mart, from the vision of Sam Walton to the vowed commitment to neighborhoods and communities. Every rule is explained in detail, from^B stories of Soderquist's own career in the retail giant to tales of real-life associates who have made it up the ladder. Plus, each chapter ends with a handful of questions for reflection and action; for example, how comfortable are you with change? Are you committed to growth? Sidebars explore salient quotes from the likes of Ben Franklin and Warren Buffet and feature little-known facts and figures about Fortune magazine's number-one multinational corporation. Problem is, it's written with a promotional twist and "we're the best" attitude that's sometimes hard to believe in light of recent Wal-Mart headlines.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
Copyright © 2011 www.rajitachaudhuri.com